JDRF’s pro type one campaign

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    • #9894

      I’ve briefly covered JDRF’s type-one centric campaign over here: https://www.shootuporputup.co.uk/2010/10/jdrf-launch-pro-type-one-campaign/

      So do you think type one’s get a rough deal compared to the more populous type two’s? Do you think campaigns should or need to be split by type of diabetes. Or should campaign’s lump all types of diabetes together. Woof!

    • #11380
      Tim
      Keymaster

      Division between type ones and types twos can get a bit extreme. I wrote an article here:

      https://www.shootuporputup.co.uk/2009/08/diabetics-are-revolting/

      when Diabetes Australia basically split into two factions over the ancient type one / type two argument.

    • #11381
      Annette A
      Participant

      Do we get a rough deal? I dont really think so. Do campaigns need to be split by type? Yes, because there is still a fairly yawning chasm in the populace’s understanding of the difference between types, so any campaign that doesn’t specifically say what it’s targetting will probably just add to the confusion.

    • #11384
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I saw that pop up in my RSS feed, but kinda ignored it, because personally I’m pretty happy with everything (except my sugar control, but that’s MY personal problem!). I don;t feel like I’m being let down by the health service or anything like that.

      The only thing I would want to change is to educate people better about the difference between type one and two. Even the type twos I meet at work (the average age is about 55!) don’t seem to realise how big a difference there is between the two types.

      @Tim – I think that split you mention is a good thing, in a way. It at least makes it clearer that the two types are different, especially in terms of prevention/treatment. I think, while complete separation is a bit far (one organisation has more power, obviously), maybe clear different departments within could be smart. Maybe I should have added this last bit to the other post?!

    • #11387
      Hairy Gnome
      Participant

      Down at the ‘sharp end’ of diabetes (pun intended), I think we all realise that the needs of T1s and T2s, though similar, are fundamentally different.

      For years after I was first diagnosed I insisted that ‘diabetic was diabetic’ and it took me a long time to appreciate the difference between pancreatic dysfunction and insulin resistance. This fundamental difference in the afflictions means a fundamental difference in the management of them, but the consequences of mismanagement are the same! What this says to me is that although we need to talk about and treat T1 and T2 diabetes separately, the victims of both types need to present a united face to the world, and especially the powers that be.

      I’ve gained so much from this site, which, although it was intended for T1s has made me very welcome as a token T2. It has given me insight into a world that is vastly different from my own, but where we are tied together by a need to artificially control our blood sugars. I didn’t realise for instance, that a couple of units of insulin can make the difference between stable and hypo, and I’m sure some of you T1s didn’t realise that I could inject quantities of insulin that would put you T1s into an irreversible coma. @neobrainless mentioned prevention, and whilst I agree that many T2s could have been prevented, mainly by controlling obesity, I can’t see any way that T1 diabetes can be foreseen, let alone prevented, and the same goes for a core number of T2s.

      What we have to remember though. is that the prognosis for both types can potentially lead to life changing events like blindness, kidney failure, amputation, and heart failure. T1 or T2, the consequences of mismanagement are the same, and this is why we must present a united face to the world.

      The causes may be different, but we are all insulin dependant!

    • #11388
      Annette A
      Participant

      Well put, @teloz. In fact, I’m not even going to be pedantic about the spelling… :-)

    • #11393
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Again @Teloz well said.
      Education to all!

      All Diabetics need a consistent approach. Its disgraceful that in GB certain guidelines are not given to newly diagnosed T1+2 because they live in an area where funding is non existent. All non diabetics should be given the basic knowledge that sometimes T1 do need to have something sweet and that whilst a large proportion of T2 may be obese there are some who through no fault of their own become diabetic. Education of those not pc needs to also stress that because we do shoot up we are not drug addicts and do not wish to use the bathroom!

      I think a united front is the only way to go with sub-division for T1+2.

    • #11400
      Hairy Gnome
      Participant

      @annette – Feel free to be pedantic about my spelling, though I can’t see where I went wrong, and neither can my spelling checker! :D

    • #11401
      Cecile
      Participant

      @teloz: It’s a case of case – in Britain, at least, “we” are all insulin dependent insulin dependants…all for the sake of consistent pedantry (I’ve smacked poor @neobrainless about it on a previous occasion, so I guess I should give your beard a pluck, too ;))

    • #11410
      Annette A
      Participant

      This has brought up a memory of a query I had a long time ago (as a teenager, I think) back when T2s were still considered to be diabetic due to weight – causing their bodies to have to produce more insulin, and hence becoming ‘immune’ to insulin and needing more of it etc- insulin resistant in other words. I was told that I was having to inject more insulin that a non-diabetic produced, due to it being used less efficiently, and it getting ‘lost’ at the injection site. My query then was ‘Does that mean I’ll become T2 as well as T1?’ Didnt really get an answer…

    • #11411
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @Annette: I’ve been told it’s certainly possible to get type 2 if you’re already type 1, but only if you don’t look after yourself… From my understanding of how it works I would say that the extra insulin you need because of the inefficiencies and ‘losses’ wouldn’t affect the likelihood of getting T2, as surely the fact that they aren’t affecting your BGs means they aren’t doing ANYTHING?!

      Of course, all that is based PURELY on my own somewhat less than perfect understanding of it all…

    • #11454
      Alison
      Keymaster

      While personally its really irritating if people think I’m Type 2, politically it works far better to lump the two together. Type 2 is a massive financial burden (hence why Teloz gets a bit nervous when ShootUp starts brainstorming about how much a cull could save!) and its growing enormously. Type 1 is miniscule in comparison. Diabetes is higher up the Govt agenda than it ever has been thanks to the ever increasing cost of T2. We T1’s benefit from that by sneaking in under the general diabetes umbrella and then once we’re at the table, making sure our minority needs are catered for. I see T2 as the battering ram that opens the doors of power for us little T1s.

    • #11461
      Tim
      Keymaster

      @alison – a very good point. Types Twos have a use after all then (sorry @teloz ;-) )

    • #11470
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @annette I think you could still technically have the same problems as a type 2 (i.e develop resistance to insulin because of weight) but as you would be monitoring your sugars and compensating for raised levels, the only symptom you would have would be injecting more insulin. When I lost some weight recently I had to reduce my insulin (it had less work to do!), which suggests that insulin resistance is a factor for T1s too (obviously I’m ignoring all the other causes of T2). I doubt you would be officially be diagnosed as T2 though- T1 wins!

    • #11477
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Yup it is possible to have 1 and 2. Apparently its called 1.5 in the medical world. This is what i apparently have as they make me take metformin as well as my insulin. However other than dodgy bowels i never notice any difference between me taking my insulin with metformin or me taking my insulin without it.

      You have possibly answered my question about problems im having with my control and weight gain. As im getting fatter im having to take more and more insulin. At the moment i take 30-40 units of novorapid with each meal and 120 units of levemir at night at the amount is just increasing every month. As ive heard novorapid makes you gain weight i think im in a bit of a viscous circle at the moment.

    • #11478
      Annette A
      Participant

      Um, no. Type 1.5 is a different condition to types 1 or 2. It is characterised by having antibodies to the beta cells (one particular kind, as opposed to the several found in T1), still producing some insulin, but not having insulin resistance. It has characteristics of both T1 and T2, but is neither. I understand metfomin works (in part) by increasing cell insulin sensitivity, which is not deficient in T1.5 – which perhaps is why you dont notice any difference?
      The weight gain thing is totally person specific. I’ve heard of people who lose weight on lantus/levemir/novorapid/humaolg, and who gain weight on lantus/levemir/novorapi/humalog…I found no effects at all from either Novorapid or Lantus (nor any other insulin) – but it’s different for everyone.

    • #11490
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Hmm well ive only ever had one nurse say i am possibly 1.5 the way she explained it was its a bit of both. Is there anyway they can specifically tell you if you are type 1 or 1.5 because surely the treatment would differ? Going to see the doctor tomorrow to have a bit of a whinge about my care and to see if she can book me in to see the specialist.

    • #11491
      Annette A
      Participant

      You can tell if its T1 or T1.5 by a blood test to see what antibodies you carry (T1s have 4 or 5 types in particular, T1.5s have only one of them). But whether this test is widely available, I dont know. You can but ask.

    • #11496
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      There is a good definition here: http://www.diabetesnet.com/diabetes_types/diabetes_type_15.php#axzz14Fzy1wug
      They say type 1.5 is ‘slow onset type one’ – so you may initially be treated with tablets but eventually need insulin because the diabetes is caused by your pancreas packing up, rather than insulin resistance. So I’m guessing if you have always had insulin, you are certainly a type 1.

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