Time zones and insulin

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  • This topic has 8 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated 9 years ago by Anonymous.
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    • #5977
      Tim
      Keymaster

      Times zones are generally a pain in the bum – frankly I wish the world was flat. But it’s not. So how do you deal with travelling from time zone to time zone – especially dealing with your long acting insulin?

    • #7472
      Annette A
      Participant

      Irrelevant to the actual question (and forum), but I wonder if it comes from the same school of thought that had Stephen missing a dose (which does sound a bit odd) – When my sister went to Australia with her hubbie, who is T2 (but is semi disabled following a stroke, and is reliant on my sister for his care), one piece of advice given was to miss a dose of his tablets (metformin) on the way out and add an extra dose on the way back.
      She didnt in the end [she decided to put in a stopover in both directions so he wouldn’t have too long a journey, which meant she could move his tablets rather than miss/add them] but it still seemed a bit extreme.

    • #7474
      Stephen
      Participant

      The logic behind mine was if I didn’t skip a Lantus dose, I would of had three in 24 hours rather than two. Again bearing in mind I was trying to control my sugars with Novorapid boosts along the way ….. (epic fail though!)

      Departing

      10:30 UK (05:30 US) – Lantus (Morning) [UK morning shot]
      22:30 UK (17:30 US) – Skip [UK evening shot]
      03:30 UK (22:30 US) – Lantus (Evening) [US evening shot] – Transition to US time
      15:30 UK (10:30 US) – Lantus (Morning) [US morning shot] – Now fully on US time

      Return

      10:30 US (15:30 UK) – Lantus (Morning) [US morning shot]
      22:30 US (03:30 UK) – Skip [US evening shot]
      05:30 US (10:30 UK) – Lantus (Morning) [UK morning shot] – Transition to UK time
      17:30 US (22:30 UK) – Lantus (Evening) [UK evening shot] – Now fully on UK time

    • #7477
      Cecile
      Participant

      Also Sprach ADA…and they presume you travel by plane, not TARDIS :)

    • #7480
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I always just leave my phone on UK time and have it at the ‘normal’ time regardless of the new time zone. Is that wrong?!

    • #7482
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @Hillary Having never travelled further than Italy I think that’s a very good idea. However i think any alteration just means more blood tests and again dare I say with” the pump” it would be a lot easier.

    • #7483
      Stephen
      Participant

      @hils I wouldn’t say wrong, just depends on the distance really. As @mustard said, Europe is probably easy enough to leave it on UK time but states and or further could mean 3/4/5am wake ups for Lantus which isn’t too great in my mind.

      I’m not sure if it would make it easier for pump users, maybe someone could pitch in with more knowledge than me?

      If you are on a variable dose on a pump (say double during the night than the day,) then I would imagine have to adjust else when you got abroad you might for example end up having your double dose through the day rather than the night – your body should only take a couple of days to realise it’s all changed, my DP took two days to adjust to rising in the night US time instead of the late evening when it still thought it was on UK time.

    • #7484
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      We went to France Yes only an hour away but I just changed the clock on my pump same as when the hour went on. How it effects you with tiredness I don’t or wish to know. (God I’m old) As a student working till 4am building models I needed more insulin but it depends on what you are doing. Also if you travel to somewhere hot it zapps your insulin dose. In France I decreased my basal by 0.1 units every hour to accommodate the less stress attitude on holiday. Alison would be a good person to ask.

    • #7580
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Sorry I’m a bit late to this post but I travel a lot for my job and have tried various different ways of dealing with my Lantus dose. When I went to Bangkok I was advised to take my normal dose at the normal UK time and then take half the dose 12 hours later then back to normal dose the next day. When I went to Kuala Lumpur (same sort of part of the world) I took my Lantus at 9pm rather than the middle of the day. This turned out to be a bit of a pain as I kept forgetting at first so I posted a note on the wall at work to remind me. When its just an hour difference in Europe I adjust it in half hour stages both ways. Hope this helps.

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