Cholesterol levels

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    • #10027
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Oh dear, I have tried and yet my cholesterol levels will not come down.
      I eat fruit and veg (I have broad shoulders to carry the comment made by consultant do you “eat fruit and veg”) I take my dog out for two brisk walks a day for up to 1 hour at a time. I don’t consume vast quantities of wine (Yes I may have done when younger but wine and kids don’t work).

      My lovely dietitian is presently putting the diet sheet I sent her into her special computer to analyze my fat in-take. I am not really hopeful, I honestly dont know what else I can do and I feel like I have failed. I know I haven’t really its just very annoying because I have always tried so hard. So… statins here we come…. unless any suggestions ??

    • #13296
      Tim
      Keymaster

      I really know nothing about cholesterol; though I think I read somewhere that your cholesterol is 90% controlled by genetics and 10% by what you eat, etc. This might be entirely bulldust (as they used to say on Neighbours) but I don’t really know. I expect – as always – there’s someone else around who will know a zillion times more about it than me.

      In the meantime – I hope you get it sorted. Is going on statins a problem? Do they have any long or short term effects?

    • #13307
      Annette A
      Participant

      Same problem. I eat healthily,exercise regularly, don’t really drink,eat all the right stuff (oats,soy,flaxseed etc) but my cholesterol remained high. But my Dad has high cholesterol and his mum had high cholesterol and therefore it was probably inevitable I’d have it as well. Went on statins a few months ago and have had no problems.Cholesterol down, no side effects. And Tim, statins are usually for life. Inherited (hyperfamilial cholesterama or something) means permanently high cholesterol. Don’t worry Katherine,you haven’t failed,its just another thing to add to the list of non-voluntary medical situations…

    • #13308
      Cecile
      Participant

      @annette: Thank you for yet another Shoot Up neologism – Cholesterama sounds like a deli that barters butter, cream cheese & salami :D

    • #13311
      Tim
      Keymaster

      @annette – “non-voluntary medical situation” now there’s a great description for diabetes / high cholesterol, etc.! :-)

    • #13315
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I knew I could rely on you chums to lighten the “non-voluntary medical situation” just what I needed.
      @Tim: Doc’s don’t really know much about them and their long term effects. Side effects can be be a problem but I’ll give them a go.

    • #13329
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      My (also diabetic) dad is on statins, and the only thing he has complained about is no longer being allowed to have grapefruit juice (apparently it has some weird reaction to the drugs). I’m pretty sure I’d never seen him drink it before he went on them, but it seems to really annoy him nevertheless!

    • #13331
      lizz
      Participant

      Statins can cause prostate cancer, I was reading the other day, so watch out for that. And other cancers.

      http://www.prostate.net/2011/prostate-cancer/do-statins-increase-your-risk-of-prostate-cancer/

      Katherine, try oat milk. In everything. I used to use soya as I am allergic to dairy – so switched to soya when I read how unpleasant it is, and my cholesterol fell by quite a bit. Oat milk is pleasant, goes in tea well, I drink coffee black but it does go in coffee as well as soya does..

    • #13332
      lizz
      Participant

      Also has anyone been watching that TV programme about food as medicine? Has it had anything on about cholesterol? I only saw one of them…

    • #13333
      Annette A
      Participant

      I like grapefruit, so am a little put out that I cant have it any more (it makes the drugs stronger, so they work better, apparently.) I tried Oat milk. It tasted vile and had no effect on my cholesterol. Everyone is different…And I dont think I need to worry about prostate cancer :-)

    • #13336
      Tim
      Keymaster

      How do you milk an oat?

    • #13341
      Annette A
      Participant

      Well, first of all, you have to identify and catch the female oat. As all oats look the same, this is usually a thankless task, which results in most people just soaking them in water (I think you may have to boil them, but I’m not sure) and then usuing the resulting liquid. Which is rather unpleasant for the aforementioned little oats, which have had their lives cruely cut short. No more happily gamboling in the fields for you, little oat…

    • #13342
      Tim
      Keymaster

      That’s the saddest story I’ve ever heard :~-( We must campaign to end cruelty to our oaty friends! (It’ll probably be as successful a campaign as most diabetes-related campaigns*)

      * little bit of satire there :-)

    • #13343
      Cecile
      Participant

      In order to milk an oat,
      Approach it just like a goat:
      Make sure it’s nan’s teat
      You of juice deplete
      To prevent a seedy note.

    • #13367
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      My wifes been hurting since she went on statins, is this one of the known side effects?

    • #13372
      Annette A
      Participant

      Yes, muscular pains could indicate that she isn’t taking a statin that suits her. She should talk to her doctor.

    • #13373
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks, the doctors cancelled her last two appointments so I’m hoping for third time lucky.

    • #13374
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Having spoken to my aunt she has said that both her and my other aunt and uncle are taking statins because of high C. My younger aunt was getting muscular pains and has switched more recently to the same type as the older aunt – so I thought that when the time comes I’ll try and persuade the doc’s to give me the same type or at least to try it first.

    • #13377
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Statins get a fair bit of bad press on D forums, but this is possibly partly because the Docs are so desperate to get everyone on to them. I’ve read lots of conflicting reports about their benefits and drawbacks, and have yet to face the question myself.

      As far as I can tell there is (perhaps) a bit more leeway depending on the breakdown of your total chol. Do you have HDL/LDL/Trigs splits? The ratios between particle sizes seems to be thought to be the better indicator of risk in some circles.

    • #13378
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @Mike My results are HDL = 4.33, LDL=3.4 , TG = 0.4Its total chol = 7.9 (eek) Its my LDL which have suddenly risen.
      I have yet to hear from my dietitian who is kindly examining a diet sheet I completed. As always its the question of the unknown which is the frightening thing.

    • #13626
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Well my wife was told to stop taking the statins immediately.

      Lots of muscular pain, a huge amount of extra insulin daily and blood sugars perminantly running in the high ‘teens.

      There does seem to be a push towards getting diabetics onto statins for some reason I don’t really understand particularly when the NHS is strapped for cash.

    • #13628
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      My dietitian has said that in some areas doctors believe that once you’ve been diabetic for 20-25 years you should be on statins. Apparently us T1’s don’t always break down the fat properly. Indeed, only today my diet results came through which indicated that my diet was exceedingly healthy and no changes could be made (beats smug b/s readings earlier @Tim). So off for chat with GP on Monday but will watch out for pain and high b/s.

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