Poll results – what medical identification should a diabetic use?

By | 16 June, 2011
Odd Sverressøn Klingenberg

Odd Sverressøn Klingenberg, Norwegian Minister of Social Affairs 1920-1921, who might have voted in this poll. Possibly.

Well, well, well, well, well, well, well, it’s that time of the month again – the eagerly anticipated poll results post. Huzzah!

Last time we asked what medical identification should a diabetic use. As usual the silly result came top, order blood pressure pill US, with “Tattoo saying ‘diabetic’ on forehead & brass bell” garnering 46% of the vote and thus commanding a clear majority. I’ve rushed out to buy shares in brass bell companies this afternoon and I advise you to do the same.

In second place came “A discrete bracelet or dog tag” with 35% of the vote. This is my preferred option. Though I’m afraid to report that my dog tag generally remains in my bedside cabinet and rarely graces my neck, which entirely defeats the purpose of owning said dog tag.

Down in the dog-end of the results came “Nothing – I hate wearing medical ID” with 7% and the deeply cynical answer of “Nothing – nobody would look at it anyway” coming close behind with 6%. Finally, “Wallet ID” trailed in last with 6%.

So there we have it.

This month to tie-in with Diabetes Week (woo.) we’re asking how many people you tell about your diabetes. Cast your vote over there (**points slightly downwards and to the right of your screen**)

Those results in full:

Tattoo saying “diabetic” on forehead & brass bell (46%, 61 Votes)
A discrete bracelet or dog tag (35%, 47 Votes)
Nothing – I hate wearing medical ID (7%, 9 Votes)
Nothing – nobody would look at it anyway (6%, 8 Votes)
Wallet ID (6%, 8 Votes)

12 thoughts on “Poll results – what medical identification should a diabetic use?

  1. Tim

    Apparently the chap in the picture was a son of attorney Sverre Olafssøn Klingenberg (1844–1913), and a brother of Kaare Sverressøn Klingenberg and a grandnephew of engineer Johannes Benedictus Klingenberg, if anyone’s interested.

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  2. Rohan

    Heh. I love Norwegian names. My parents sold their house to a gay couple, one of whom was called Bent. Can’t help but laugh! My dad also knew an Odd Bagge, which with Norwegian pronunciation is also highly amusing for simple minds 🙂

    BTT: I would wear a bracelet probably, except that such things are banned from workshops, where I spend my working life atm. I just go for telling everyone I’m diabetic, and let them deal with it 😛

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  3. Tim

    @neobrainless – *sniggers at playground humour* 🙂

    Ah, if you can’t wear bracelets you need a giant “diabetic” tattoo then. Are brass bells allowed?

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  4. Rohan

    I could probably get away with sticking a brass bell on my compulsory ID card. And I’m already talking to local tattoo artists about a nice big forehead tat!

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  5. Paul

    I voted for “they wouldn’t look at it”, I’m afraid to say it wasn’t cynical but based on experience in A&E.

    I just don’t see the point of them, a random stranger won’t look & wouldn’t know what to do anyway. A&E , etc should check glucose & realise the persons diabetic if hypoing but otherwise I prefer not giving someone the option to shoot insulin into me without knowing anything about my history or medical needs!

    Too much sugar won’t kill me, too much insulin will.

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  6. Gemma

    I really don’t think people should wear any form of ID. I feel pretty strongly about this topic.
    If you’re found on the street in a heap, someone will hopefully call an ambulance and then the medically trained people will hopefully treat you. If you’re low they’ll work it out.
    The reason I don’t agree in ID is because diabetic people collapse for reasons other than hypoglycaemia. We are normal people as well as diabetics and therefore can collapse of normal people stuff (heart attacks, low blood pressure, dehydration etc) and if my body is already struggling to cope with the effects of one of these numerous things, I do not want it to have to cope with a massively high blood sugar caused by a dose of glycogon given because of a tag on my wrist/ tattoo on my face.

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      1. Alison

        Wow. I think I’d prefer a more subtle 10cm high blue “D” stamped across my forehead.

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