Poll results – how to you like to be referred to as a diabetic?

By | 10 June, 2009

Well thrill seekers, the results of our first poll are in. In answer to the question “As someone with diabetes, how do you like to be referred to?” unsurprisingly the majority replied with “diabetic”, with the politically-correct “pancreatically-challenged” coming in a close second.

The medieval-style “victim of the pissing evile” was less popular (probably because it takes so long to say), with the aggressive “don’t label me you fascist” coming in last place. So what does this tell us?

Well, not a lot really.

Diabetics don’t seem to mind being called diabetic and I don’t think many people have even thought about it all that much. Which is a pity because I wanted to launch a campaign to have the label “diabetic” declared politically-incorrect and replaced with something else like “pancreatically-challenged”, much to the chagrin of most normal people. A year or so later I would then launch another campaign to “reclaim” the word diabetic as a label.

None of this would achieve anything – but, by God, it would fill the blog out with easy articles! Yay!

Pollsters will be thrilled to see that there is now a new poll up – “The best way of managing Type One diabetes?”

Choices range from the futuristic – “22nd century – stem cell splicing” to the medieval “17th century – trepanning” with some slightly more sensible options in between.

So let us, and the world, know what you think is the best way of managing Type One. Polls have no safeguards whatsoever and so, much like an election in a dodgy African state, you can vote as many times as you like for whatever option you like as often as you like. As long as your choice is the correct one!

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About Tim

Diagnosed with Type One when he was 28, Tim founded Shoot Up in 2009. For the diabetes geeks, he wears a Medtronic 640G insulin pump filled with Humalog and uses Abbott's Libre flash glucose monitor.

15 thoughts on “Poll results – how to you like to be referred to as a diabetic?

  1. Tim

    Well, this is a slightly redundant post now that the polls no longer work!

    Reply
  2. Tim

    Thanks Tim – the polls will be working again soon, don’t worry!

    Reply
  3. Alison

    I think all those hours rebuilding the blog have sent you mad, probably best if you take a break now dear before you crack up completely

    Reply
  4. Rosie

    This is really reassuring! I try to say ‘person with diabetes’ because I’d rather feel like a nong than ever offend someone.
    I don’t know about the real world application of ‘pancreatically challenged’, though…

    Reply
    1. Nig

      Please pardon my ignorance, @rosief , but what is a “nong” and what does a nong feel like?
      Whatever it is, I must say I like the word! πŸ™‚ Sounds slightly Milliganeqsue!
      Personally, I’m a diabetic.

      Reply
  5. Annette A

    I’m diabetic. Always have been, always will be (unless scientific breakthroughs suddenly take a massive lead forward, whcih I doubt).
    ‘Person with Diabetes’ has always struck me as being from the pc brigade which insists on calling blind people ‘visually challenged’ or short people ‘vertically challenged’.

    Reply
  6. Alison

    It’s a hard one, I call myself diabetic, but when I hear Dr’s talk about diabetics as if they’re some kind of specific breed rather than individuals I get a little irritated -https://www.shootuporputup.co.uk/2009/08/what-am-i/

    Reply
  7. Diana Maynard

    Blind people and “visually challenged” (actually the term is “visually impaired”) is entirely different though. Most blind people still have some sight (I’m registered blind but I still play sport and go mountain biking, and don’t use a white stick, though technically I should). So visually impaired actually makes much more sense! With diabetes, you’re either diabetic or you’re not, there’s no half measures as there is with blindness. Calling short people vertically challenged is, however, daft…. I’m a short visually impaired diabetic!!!

    Reply
  8. Mike

    Or how about something like “person with a sub standard endocrine system” 【ツ】

    Reply
  9. Nig

    @mikeinspain – that implies there is a “standard endocrine system”; from what I’ve seen most peoples’ endocrine systems are at least a bit unusual if not actually broken in some respect! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  10. Mike

    @nigho Very true.. Will have to think up something better! 【ツ】Bugger!

    Reply

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