Living with diabetes

Living with Type One diabetes is a pain in the bum. It’s not until you’re diagnosed with Type One and your pancreas finally goes all out of goose that you realise what it does all day, lurking there behind your stomach.

Pancreases (what is the plural of pancreas?)  are marvellous things, they automatically squirt just the right amount of insulin in proportion to your food intake; they spew out different amounts depending on where you are – be it in the freezing, bitter chill of an Arctic storm or the dripping heat of a sleazy sauna in Soho. It takes account of other hormones, such as adrenalin, which might be coursing through your body when stressed (hiding up a tree from a lion after a safari has gone badly wrong, for example) and a myriad number of other things too. Pretty bloody cool.

However, we members of club Type One (woo!) have to manually emulate what our clever pancreas used to do automatically. This is not easy; however, as a full time diabetic (I wish could be part time) I’ve learned a few bits and pieces which may be of use. They might not, in which case contact me and put me right. I dare you.

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Living with Type One diabetes is a pain in the bum. It’s not until you’re diagnosed with Type One and your pancreas finally goes all out of goose that you realise what it does all day, lurking there behind your stomach.

Pancreases (what is the plural of pancreas?) are marvellous things, they automatically squirt just the right amount of insulin in proportion to your food intake; they spew out different amounts depending on where you are – be it in the freezing, bitter chill of an Arctic storm or the dripping heat of a sleazy sauna in Soho. It takes account of other hormones, such as adrenalin, which might be coursing through your body when stressed (hiding up a tree from a lion after a safari has gone badly wrong, for example) and a myriad number of other things too. Pretty bloody cool.

However, we members of club Type One (woo!) have to manually emulate what our clever pancreas used to do automatically. This is not easy; however, as a full time diabetic (I wish could be part time) I’ve learned a few bits and pieces which may be of use. They might not, in which case contact me and put me right. I dare you.

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